/  Design

  • "No detailed design documentation"?

    This plank of Agile Development, appled to Design, is often misunderstood as
    "No detailed design effort"

    But start with bad basic ideas, and you can prototype, test & fix all you like, but you won't get a good design out of it. You'll be out in that desert, walking in circles.

    You still need to design the UX of key activities, just wide enough and deep enough that you're sure they'll hang together well, before you start coding the "features" the UX requires.

    I can plug my design skills into any design effort, in any type of development process...>>


    Confused!

  • 1) I design with our range of users, their wants and abilities in mind:

    • map out their key activities/journeys
    • design features in their terms
    • design screens that they can handle
    • find issues in each iteration by new users 'speaking aloud thoughts'

    ...>>


    Sophistication

  • 2) Of the dozens of "rules of thumb" my designs will in particular:

    • have clearer, more intelligible screens, even at the cost of "more clicks" (users prefer this way)
    • use real-world graphical layouts, not rows of icons, to imply meaning and relationships
      (like the picture, left)
      (like the NavBar equation, above)
    • avoid any reliance on "gestures"
    • use only simple animations, and only where they help intelligibility (a la iPhone)
    • make features "discoverable" over time

    ...>>


    Real-world graphical layouts

  • 3) Plus, experience has made these less common skills second nature:

    • Taking great care over simple, unambiguous wording is the quickest, cheapest improvement for all UIs. (It helps to be a writer.)
    • 'Personas' are fine if you're new to design. Instead, at every point I'm trying to find any combination of user type, use situation, data etc that could possibly go wrong.
    • "Prototype in your head" – with each screen I ask "what might they misunderstand, not understand, or try? What could go wrong at this point", till I can find no more.

    ...>>


    Sure you're jargon-free?